McNally Robinson Booksellers

Section Tour Sunday - Mystery Novels with Liz

Sunday section tours went missing for awhile there. To commemorate their return we’re taking a look through McNally Robinson’s Mystery section with section manager Liz. 
1) Any exciting news about your section?
Peter May, the multi award-winning author of numerous crime thrillers, including the internationally bestselling Lewis Trilogy, in conversation and signing the Fin MacLeod crime thrillers The Black House and The Lewis Man will be here on September 16th
Last summer, I picked up a advance reading copy of The Black House and was quickly drawn in by the haunting landscape of the remote Isle of Lewis, situated in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides, and the glimpses into Fin MacLeod’s boyhood spent there. 
On November 17th McNally Robinson is hosting No. 1 bestselling crime and thriller writer, Peter James, in conversation with Terry MacLeod CBC Radio One 89.3 FM/990 AM’s The Weekend Morning Show and signing his latest book Want You Dead.  Want You Dead is the tenth book in the Detective Roy Grace series.

2)What should people be aware of in your section that they maybe aren’t?
  In addition to current bestsellers, we carry old favourites like Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, Dashiel Hammett, and Arthur Conan Doyle.  Sherlock Holmes is definitely holding his own against the likes of Harry Hole and Jack Reacher.  

I would like to bring attention to the Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo Inspector Martin Beck series.  Writing in Sweden of the 1960’s, they have been called the “best writers of police procedural in the world”  by The Birmingham Post and were among the first to incorporate a social consciousness into their work. 
 


3)What are you hand selling these days?
Roseanna, the first Martin Beck Mystery, is the the  book I hand sell most frequently. In addition, I often hand sell Jussi Adler-Olsen’s books from the Department Q Series.  Customers enjoy this series featuring homicide detective Carl Morck.  
For the past month or so, we have had a display called “First in the Series”, promoting the first books of many different series. Included are the familiar, such as Henning Mankel’s Faceless Killers and Jar City by Arnaldur Indridason, alongside new mysteries such as Becky Masterman with the first Bridget Quinn #1 Rage Against the Dying or Belgium’s Pieter Aspe Square of Revenge.    

In the future, a small portion of the Mystery section will be allocated to books which are the firsts in many more series.

4)Any new trends? 
We are looking forward to a new release from the always popular Louise Penny, A Long Way Homecoming in August.  Penny’s How the Light Gets In is releasing in paperback on July 29th.

5)Any perfect mysteries for the cabin?
The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affaira first book release for Switzerland’s Joel Dicker, sold more than two million copies in Europe and has been on several ‘summer reads’ lists.  It will be interesting to see how it is received in Canada.

More Summer Reads:
The Black-Eyed Blonde: A Philip Marlowe Novel Benjamin Black
New Philip Kerr novel Prayer 
The Son by Jo Nesbo
Black Rock by John McFetridge
6)What should we look forward to in the section?

I am personally looking forward to delving into The Last Policeman Series by Ben H. Winters, mysteries set in pre-apocalyptic United States.

millionsmillions:

Pssst… There’s some free Zadie Smith fiction over this way…

millionsmillions:

Pssst… There’s some free Zadie Smith fiction over this way


by incidentalcomics:
Literary Consolation Prizes (for the NY Times Book Review)

by incidentalcomics:

Literary Consolation Prizes (for the NY Times Book Review)

(via canariumbooks)

Fri…erm… Weekend Reads

Liz is reading Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter, the first book in Simone de Beauvoir’s autobiographical series

                      

Tamar is reading Mary E. Pearson’s new Kiss of Deception this weekend.

Looking forward to some sweet YA reading time

John T is reading Abdellah Taïa’s An Arab Melancholia, the autobiographical novel of an openly gay Arab man that explores his writing life and search for love

Tyler has picked up one of this years staff picks and is reading Postmortal by Drew Magary

 It’s… disturbing. Great book, but it makes me feel claustrophobic and fear the future. So. Many. People

Lindsay is in a fairy tale type mood and is reading The Very Best of Charles de Lint followed up with Muse and Reverie also by Charles de Lint

                       

Ryan is reading Cujo by Stephen King

Karen is reading The Haunted Bookshop by Christopher Morley, recommended by Nikki 

So far it is quite delightful and is quite amazing how many of the references to working in a bookshop in 1919 still rings so true today for us more modern bookshop employees. The joy that a good book brings is just a priceless today as it has always been

Megan has picked up Parenting Without borders by Christine Gross-Loh 

It’s really interesting to learn that all we take for granted in parenting is inherently cultural…

OH!

I’m also reading Four, which is pretty good, but pshhhh

                                     

explore-blog:

Happy birthday, beloved children’s book author Ruth Krauss  (July 25, 1901–July 10, 1993)! Celebrate with Open House for Butterflies, her final and loveliest collaboration with Maurice Sendak.

explore-blog:

Happy birthday, beloved children’s book author Ruth Krauss  (July 25, 1901–July 10, 1993)! Celebrate with Open House for Butterflies, her final and loveliest collaboration with Maurice Sendak.

(via politicsprose)

The only rules are
Don’t get it wet andNEVER EVER feed it after midnight

John Green​ is all anyone wants this summer

Three titles in this weeks bestsellers! Wow-Za!

Bookseller Friday Reads

John T. is reading Rivka Galchen’s new short story collection American Innovations

Liz picked up Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

                                             

Dante just started Julia Serano’s Whipping Girl

which is an insightful look into her own life, and the culture surrounding transgender issues

Tyler is reading Homer’s Iliad

It’s, um, challenging

Ashley is planning on reading The Secret Diary of Lizzie BennetThe novel companion to The Lizzie Bennet Diaries YouTube series.

I loved the videos, so I’m sure I will adore the book!

Ryan is catching up on the classics by reading Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

I’m about halfway through, and it has been excellent so far. I’m in love with, and am slightly creeped out by the trippy dystopian future that has been created. I’m crossing my fingers in hope that Mr. Huxley is not a prophet.

Dustin is reading This One Summer by Jillian and Mariko Tamaki

Angela is reading reading Night Film by Marisha Pessl

                                              

A dark mystery with an interactive element that make it all the more terrifying.

and

Dane is reading The Country of Ice Cream Star by Sandra Newman

What are you reading this Friday?

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

McNally Robinson Booksellers has teamed up with BitLit to provide the best of both worlds, the comforting familiar feeling of a physical book in your hands AND the portability of an e-book. 

Check out the deets here.

McNally Robinson Booksellers has teamed up with BitLit to provide the best of both worlds, the comforting familiar feeling of a physical book in your hands AND the portability of an e-book. 

Check out the deets here.

James always has his nose in a book

Walter Dean Myers

Walter Dean Myers passed away earlier this week at the age of 76 after a brief illness. 

The New York Times, to which he contributed often, has posted an article on his life and contributions to the world of Children’s literature.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/04/arts/walter-dean-myers-childrens-author-dies-at-76.html?_r=0

Mr. Myers has two new books coming out in the next year as well as a graphic novel adaptation of his book “Monster”.

Now for your weekly dose of Friday Reads…..

                                       

Although the sun is meant to shine, us booksellers will surely spend the weekend with a book.

Here is what McNally Robinson staff will be reading this weekend:

Joel will be reading “The Son" by Philipp Meyer

John is reading ”Nine Rabbits" by Virginia Zaharieva from Black Balloon Publishing

Tyler is reading “Robot Uprisings”, anthology edited by Daniel H. Wilson.

Must-read for robot nerds such as myself - He says

Helen is finishing off “Poisonwood Bible" by Barbara Kingsolver

Not new but a great read

Ashley is reading “Noah Barleywater Runs Away" by John Boyne

It’s a very unusual read so far but entertaining none the less

Miranda is currently reading “Eleanor Rigby" by Douglas Coupland

previously read Hey Nostradamus! and thought it was great, so I thought I’d try something else of his 

John C is continuing to read ”Salinger" by David Shields.

I’m almost half-way through it, thoroughly enjoying it. If you’re a fan of Salinger, this is a must read.

Matthew is reading Louis Crompton’s “Homosexuality and Civilization

A long reaching history of queer folks in the West, going back as far as the ancient Greeks. Crompton was one of the world’s first “queer theorists” and his magisterial history is lively, accessible, and utterly captivating. It’s a great and necessary read

Devon has a hold of the New Directions Poetry Pamphlet “Poems of Osip Mandelstam

Cam recommends “Testo Junkie" by Beatriz Preciado. He describes it as

Bracingly personal new narrative-style vignettes that alternate seamlessly with a bold Foucaldian account of the laboratory called a person. 

WOWEE.

Send us your Friday Reads friends, or tweet the @mcnallyrobinson, #fridayreads